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PT 948, 949 Stephen Ministries 1-2 credits

Taken as an alternative for PT 950, 951 Field Experience, this supervised ministry involves training lay ministers in appropriate listening and Christ centered caring skills. The certified Stephen Ministry Training Program schedule usually involves evening meetings from November through March. It involves a total of 50 hours of classroom and on-site training with additional time spent completing chapter readings and some written assignments (about 1-1.5 hours per week). The total time commitment of 90 hours for two semesters is equivalent to PT 950-51.

PT 950, 951 Field Experience 1-2 credits

The intent of these courses is to provide seminary students with defined and intentional ‘hands on’ ministry experience in supervised situations. Off-site resources used include: local congregations; retirement centers, nursing homes, etc. In addition, readings, journaling of experiences, and interaction with the on-site supervisor and the Seminary Instructor aid the student in sharpening his/her God-given gifts for ministry.

PT 952 Clinical Pastoral Education 5 credits

This educational ‘process model’ of learning enables students to develop ministry skills through individual and group interviews, teaching seminars and clinical case presentations. Integration of theological reflection with practical experience is a key part of this program. The course focuses on three goals: 1) understanding one’s role as pastor and person; 2) developing pastoral skills in relations to one’s theology; 3) applying tools of behavioral assessment to the pastoral role. Students receive one-half unit of certification in CPE.

PT 953 Pastor as Person in Ministry 3 credits

This ‘process model’ of learning enables students to develop ministry skills through individual and group interviews, teaching seminars and clinical case presentations. Integration of theological reflection with practical experience is a key part of this program.

The course focuses on three goals: 1) understanding one’s role as pastor and person; 2) developing pastoral skills in relations to one’s theology; 3) applying tools of behavioral assessment to the pastoral role.